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Manning Park Donut Hole

‘The border is this imaginary line’: why Americans are fighting mining in B.C.’s ‘Doughnut Hole’

"Logging permits in the Skagit River headwaters will no longer be issued by the B.C. government but mining exploration is causing friction with Americans downstream. We travelled the river to meet the people fighting an Imperial Metals permit"

https://thenarwhal.ca/border-imaginary-line-why-americans-fighting-mining-doughnut-hole/?fbclid=IwAR0Soe3RxCp7eoYeMnSng5YxKep53yra653EzhBWq9_W8S1XoMYdzqRZz4o

No more logging in the Skagit-Manning donut hole.

"To protect the environment for people now and in the future, the B.C. government has taken steps to safeguard the Silverdaisy watershed from logging on the B.C. side of the Skagit River Valley.

“Effective immediately, BC Timber Sales will no longer award timber licences in the Silverdaisy area, ensuring no additional commercial forest harvesting occurs in that area,” said Doug Donaldson, Minister of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development. “We’ve heard loud and clear from individuals and groups on both sides of the border that logging should stop in the Silverdaisy, and we’re making sure that commercial timber harvesting in that area does not continue.” 

The Silverdaisy management area – commonly known as the “Donut Hole” – is about 5,800 hectares. It consists of lands removed from the original Skagit Valley Recreation Area in 1995, Skagit Provincial Forest and lands removed from E. C. Manning Park in 1968. These lands are adjacent to one another and are surrounded by both Skagit Valley Park and E. C. Manning Park."

Full Article:

https://news.gov.bc.ca/releases/2019FLNR0126-002330?fbclid=IwAR1PYtpwDaS2AYkbmGfLer8fs3p9J9R8KgTsJ1ZC3BiDqQR9x3iuFm5oPvI

 

Backcountry BC has joined an international coalition launching a campaign in opposition to proposed mining in local ‘donut hole’
Conservation, wildlife groups, First Nations call on BC Gov’t to deny mining permit in Skagit Valley
A coalition of more than 110 conservation recreation and wildlife groups, as well as local elected officials, businesses and First Nations from both British Columbia and Washington are redoubling their efforts to oppose a mining permit in one of Hope’s local waterways.
Late last year, British Columbia-based Imperial Metals applied for an exploration permit for an area between Skagit Valley and Manning Provincial Park known as a ‘donut hole,’ which is unprotected crown land.
“The recent threats to the Skagit Headwaters have underscored how important this landscape is to those in British Columbia and Washington for fish, wildlife, clean water, recreation, (Indigenous) lifeways, and a sustained quality of life,” said Tom Uniack, executive director for Washington Wild.
And while Imperial’s five-year mining proposal includes activities such as creating access roads, conducting surface exploration drilling with associated water supply and catchment sumps, and mechanical trenching, its connection to the Mount Polley mine disaster of 2014, which spilled more than 2.6 billion gallons of toxic sludge into the Fraser River watershed in one of the biggest environmental disasters in that area’s history, may be the coalition’s biggest worry.
“It would be hard to imagine a worse place for a mine than the Skagit Headwaters or a mine company with a worse record to be involved than Imperial Metals,” said Joe Foy, co-executive director of Wilderness Committee.
“The proposed mining in the Skagit headwaters poses a significant and devastating threat to our inherent Indigenous Title and Rights and the fish, wildlife and natural and cultural resources on which our existence is based,” said Grand Chief Stewart Phillip, President of the Union of BC Indian Chiefs.
“We call on the British Columbia government to honour their obligation to our people and preserve benefits for all of us who call British Columbia home, and exercise their authority to deny this permit. We need a provincial government that will stand up for the environment and uphold the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.”
Located near Hope, the Skagit Watershed is also critical to the health and well-being of the region’s residents and local recreation-based economies.
“Destinations like Manning and Skagit Provincial Park in the Skagit headwaters are part of an accessible network of protected lands that connect southwestern BC to our watershed neighbors in Washington state,” said Liz Johnson, general manager of Patagonia Vancouver.
The Skagit headwaters including Manning and Skagit provincial parks supports an amazing amount of important fish and wildlife habitats. The Skagit River is well-loved for its high-quality rainbow trout fly fishing opportunities. Bird enthusiasts know that over 200 species of birds can be found here. The Skagit headwaters also encompass wild landscapes essential to the survival and recovery of vulnerable local wildlife populations such as grizzly bear, spotted owl and bull trout.
“The protection of this area is important not just for the wilderness in British Columbia, but for the aquatic habitat (of our neighbours) downstream in Washington State,” said Bill Bosch, president of BC Wildlife Federation.

Letter to the Skagit Environmental Endowment Commission from conservation, recreation and wildlife organizations expressing and reinforcing the strong opposition to any and all resource extraction activities in the headwaters of the Skagit River, inclusive of both the British Columbia Timber Sales (BCTS) proposed block and road development in the Upper Skagit River drainage (Silverdaisy and Twenty-Six Mile Creeks) and this subsequent mineral exploration permit application which has been enabled by the roading work initiated by prior BCTS activities.

Manning Park Donut Hole resource extraction (2019-04-07)

Another Day, another 15 KM2/1,852 Hectare adventure tourism/commercial recreation permit application (including a Yurt) at Silverdaisy Mountain (see and submit comments on the application at the following link).

https://arfd.gov.bc.ca/ApplicationPosting/viewpost.jsp?PostID=55391&fbclid=IwAR0tmrNOKrP9R2bZqKwSfLhRgzBNLwEDEZl4SMJt0dyVZStxplwmP5k9oFg

I have never been a traditional "tree hugger" conservationist type and have always believed that there should be a balance between public recreation, commercial operations and pure conservation. In light of all of the recent commercial land applications/tenures, I am starting to ask the question "what happens if we run out of land?". I also wonder and question my own concept and notion of what constitutes "Wilderness", and in fact do we have much if any "Wilderness" left anymore.

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The Application: (June 8, 2018)

Client: Berntsen Enterprises Limited
Purpose: COMMERCIAL RECREATION/MULTIPLE USE
Region: Lower Mainland, Surrey
Agency: Crown Land Allocation
File: #2411996

Location: Silverdaisy Mountain 
Area (Hectares): 1,852.09 ha +- 
BCGS Mapsheet: 92H015 92H 016 
Legal Description: see below

Legal Description: THAT PART OF DL1584, BEING A.M. NO. 4 MINERAL CLAIM, DL533, BEING VERNON 4 MINERAL CLAIM, DL1586, BEING A.M. MINERAL CLAIM, DL1587, BEING A.M. NO. 2 MINERAL CLAIM, DL1577, BEING A.M. NO. 3 MINERAL CLAIM, DL1585, BEING AUGUSTUS NO. 5 FRACTION MINERAL CLAIM TOGETHER WITH THAT PARCEL OR TRACT OF LAND IN THE VICINITY OF SILVERDAISY MOUNTAIN, YDYD

The tenure application is approximately 15 square kilometers. Vehicle access is from Highway 3, 38 km east of Hope, at a pullout and parking area, called Cayuse Flats. The trail access to the area is along a resource road through a corridor of Manning Provincial Park. The road generally follows the Manning Park boundary for approximately 3.5kms, after which the road moves entirely into crown land. 
The project is considered for extensive use and consists of installing a temporary structure that would provide passing accommodation for recreational users in the surrounding area and for using existing trails and resource roads for recreation activities. In winter and summer seasons, self-propelled activities such as ski touring, snowshoeing, avalanche training, hiking and possibly mountain biking are being proposed. The winter season occurring from January to March the summer season from July to September. If users? response is positive building a cabin in the future may be an option in which case the cabin construction will fall under intensive use and will require an amendment to the existing use if authorized. 


Please refer to Management Plan and Appendices for detailed information: https://arfd.gov.bc.ca/ApplicationPosting/viewpost.jsp?PostID=55391&fbclid=IwAR0tmrNOKrP9R2bZqKwSfLhRgzBNLwEDEZl4SMJt0dyVZStxplwmP5k9oFg